Join us for a talk on Halloween folklore and traditions!

Halloween: Folklore Traditions and Global Reach

A talk by Dr Juliette Wood, Cardiff University

Join us on 28th October 2020 at 5pm via Zoom webinar for a thoroughly spooky lecture on the folklore and traditions of Halloween and associated festivals, such as Día de los Muertos, with world-renowned folklorist, author, and broadcaster Dr Juliette Wood, followed by Q&A.

To participate in the Zoom webinar, book your ticket here: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/halloween-folklore-traditions-and-global-reach-tickets-123318672469

We are also planning to stream this event via our YouTube channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCv3mkKQUDyZ_OcP-uLqJTMA/

Celebrating the Centenary of A Voyage to Arcturus

2020 marks 100 years since the publication of A Voyage to Arcturus, a science fiction (or perhaps science fantasy) novel by Scottish author David Lindsay. We will celebrate the centenary of this Scottish cult classic on 19 November, 6:00 pm – 7:30 pm via Zoom webinar.

Join the conversation as Lindsay specialists and enthusiasts celebrate the novel and its major influence on key fantasy authors of our time, including C.S. Lewis, J.R.R. Tolkien and Philip Pullman. A Voyage to Arcturus takes its protagonist from an observatory in Scotland to a new world across space, and explores philosophical and spiritual questions while creating a fully-fledged imaginary planet.

We will be joined by:

Douglas A. Anderson, a Lindsay and Tolkien scholar, who has worked extensively with Lindsay’s manuscripts and is currently preparing a new edition of A Voyage to Arcturus. He blogs at: http://tolkienandfantasy.blogspot.com/.

Nina Allan, award-winning speculative fiction author, whose recent novel The Rift won both the British Science Fiction Association Award and the Red Tentacle Award for Best Novel and references A Voyage to Arcturus.

Professor Robert Davis, Professor of Religious and Cultural Education, who has written extensively on speculative fiction and has corresponded with Philip Pullman on A Voyage to Arcturus.

The event if free but ticketed. Please book your ticket here: https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/celebrating-the-centenary-of-a-voyage-to-arcturus-tickets-117744000475

This event is presented by the Centre for Fantasy and the Fantastic via the College of Arts at the University of Glasgow as part of the Being Human festival, the UK’s only national festival of the humanities, taking place 12–22 November. For further information please see beinghumanfestival.org.

Centre for Fantasy and the Fantastic Launch: Report and Reactions

It’s already been almost two weeks since the launch event for the Centre for Fantasy and the Fantastic, and we’re still receiving so many messages welcoming this new development at the University of Glasgow, and reactions in mainstream and social media. We are listing links to press reports on the Centre further below, but we’d like to share with all of our members and followers a wonderful report from the launch event by our PhD student Grace Worm. Grace is working on the YA fantasy novels of Tamora Pierce, and is in the second year of the PhD. She tweets at https://twitter.com/dressandsword.

Fantasy and the Fantastic

By Grace Worm


On good days as a research student, it feels exciting to know that you’re contributing to something new within your field. But then days go by in front of a computer, working on the same introduction sentence for four hours, and no matter how helpful your supervisors are, it can feel like you’re all alone in a race to an impossible feat of writing.

This last year was my first as a research student. I came in so excited – seeking opportunities all over campus to discuss and evolve my research and status as an emerging scholar. Then of course COVID and lockdown happened, which left me feeling alone and questioning why my research on gender and social equality in fantasy worlds was important in a global climate of panic, fear, and a growing distrust in science and research—how could my seemingly esoteric research be meaningful now?

This last week, I attended the UofG’s launch for the Centre for Fantasy and the Fantastic and for the first time in months, I felt that I and my research were important. At the event, I got to listen to authors Dr Brian Attebery, Terri Windling, Ellen Kushner, and our own professors Dr Dimitra Fimi, Dr Matthew Sangster, Dr Rhys Williams, Dr Robert Maslen, Dr Laura Martin, Dr Maureen Farrell, and Dr Matthew Barr discussing fantasy and our university on the forefront of something that has never been done before.

In my research field and the general public, these people are legends, celebrities, people who built the building blocks of the research we’re all following now and they were talking about my university, my research, and a new age for Fantasy studies at the University of Glasgow.

In online fan communities unrelated to the university, I saw people posting about the event beforehand with captions like “Don’t you wish you were in Glasgow now?” or “A real-life place for magic” and I felt a bubbling sense of excitement and pride that we were changing the future of my field forever.

The event was for the University of Glasgow to become the first dedicated centre for fantasy studies throughout the world but it was also a declaration that we will not stop or slow down, no matter how separated we may be.

In the event chat, academics and fans alike posted where they were attending from – all over the UK and US, Europe, Asia, South America, Australia etc. If this had happened in a world without COVID, how many people could have travelled to attend the event? Would it have been recorded or published? Now it was an event for anyone who was dedicated to the fantastic.

Before lockdown, I would have been happy my university was leading the world, but now, as I watched these people discuss the future of fantasy through a Zoom call, it filled me with hope and a sense of comradery, as we, the unshown audience, shared our outfits on twitter, told others where we joined from, and asked questions from distinguished speakers.

We were together, despite everything, and in these uncertain times. We were full of life, ideas, and hope for a future we were making happen. We were celebrating Glasgow becoming the leader in fantasy studies, but now we were also leaders in how to navigate meaningful.


Centre for Fantasy and the Fantastic – Video and Media reactions

Our launch event was recorded and is available to watch via our YouTube channel:

Press stories about the Centre launch:

STV News: University to launch world’s first fantasy research centre

The Herald: Scottish university which featured in TV show Outlander to officially launch fantasy centre with author Ellen Kushner

The Sunday Post: Game of Thrones and The Hobbit worlds researched by academics in new specialist centre

INews: University of Glasgow launches world’s first ‘centre for fantasy’

MuggleNet: University of Glasgow Launches Brand-New Groundbreaking Fantasy Research Center

Lonely Planet: Why the University of Glasgow is the new hotspot for fantasy fans

Launching the Centre for Fantasy and the Fantastic, University of Glasgow

Jessie Marion King, The Frog Prince, 1913

The Eventbrite tickets for the launch webinar are now SOLD OUT, but the event will be live-streamed via our YouTube channel so please bookmark or subscribe to https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCv3mkKQUDyZ_OcP-uLqJTMA/ and access it on Wed 16 Sep at 18:00 BST.

We are delighted to launch the Centre for Fantasy and the Fantastic at the University of Glasgow with a lecture by acclaimed fantasy author Ellen Kushner, and a discussion panel on fantasy with Terri Windling, Professor Brian Attebery, and Dr Robert Maslen.

Join us on Wednesday 16th September, at 18:00 via Zoom webinar. Tickets are free. Please book your ticket to receive the Zoom link on the day of the event and have the opportunity to take part in the Q&A with our speakers.

Acclaimed fantasy author Ellen Kushner will speak about her creative practice and her engagement with Scottish folklore via her retelling of Thomas the Rhymer in her eponymous award-winning novel, and will answer questions from attendees.

Her talk will be followed by a discussion panel on the affordances and futures of fantasy, featuring:

Terri Windling, award-winning fantasy author, artist and editor

Professor Brian Attebery, Professor of English at Idaho State University, and Leverhulme Visiting Professor in Fantasy at the University of Glasgow (2019)

Dr Robert Maslen, Senior Lecturer and founder of the Fantasy MLitt, University of Glasgow

Book your ticket via this link: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/launching-the-centre-for-fantasy-and-the-fantastic-university-of-glasgow-tickets-117998060375

Header image credit: Jessie Marion King, The Frog Prince, 1913