Realms of Imagination Launch Event

Thursday December 14th, 6pm-7:30pm

Join the Centre for Fantasy and the Fantastic as we celebrate the launch of Realms of Imagination: Essays from the Wide Worlds of Fantasy, recently released by British Library Publishing as a companion volume to the Fantasy: Realms of Imagination exhibition.  This highly-illustrated book contains twenty essays providing a wide range of perspectives on Fantasy, its forms and its communities.  Collection editors Tanya Kirk and Matthew Sangster will be in conversation with essay authors Cristina Bacchilega, Dimitra Fimi, Sofia Samatar and Ann VanderMeer.

Cristina Bacchilega is Professor Emerita of English at the University of Hawai‘i-Mānoa and co-edits Marvels & Tales: Journal of Fairy-Tale Studies. Her books include Postmodern Fairy Tales: Gender and Narrative Strategies (1997), Legendary Hawai‘i and the Politics of Place (2006), Fairy Tales Transformed?: 21st-Century Adaptations and the Politics of Wonder (2013) and several co-edited anthologies. Her current projects are collaborations, one on the fantastic in the Pacific, the other on justice in contemporary fairy tales.

Dimitra Fimi is Professor of Fantasy and Children’s Literature and Co-Director of the Centre for Fantasy and the Fantastic at the University of Glasgow. Both her monographs – Tolkien, Race and Cultural History (2008) and Celtic Myth in Contemporary Children’s Fantasy (2017) – won Mythopoeic Scholarship Awards; in 2021, she received the Outstanding Contribution to Tolkien Studies Award from the Tolkien Society. She co-edits the Perspectives on Fantasy book series (Bloomsbury) with Brian Attebery and Matthew Sangster.

Tanya Kirk is Lead Curator of Printed Heritage Collections 1601-1900 at the British Library, and is the lead curator for the major exhibition Fantasy: Realms of Imagination (2023-24). She previously co-curated several other literary exhibitions at the Library, including Terror and Wonder: The Gothic Imagination (2014) and Out of This World: Science Fiction (2011). She has edited five volumes of classic ghost stories drawn from the British Library’s collections, most recently Haunters at the Hearth: Eerie Tales for Christmas Nights (2022).

Sofia Samatar’s first novel, A Stranger in Olondria (2013), won the 2014 William L. Crawford Fantasy Award, the British Fantasy Award, and the World Fantasy Award. She also received the 2014 Astounding Award for Best New Writer. Her novel The Winged Histories (2016) completed the Olondria duology, and was followed by Tender: Stories (2017), Monster Portraits (with the artist Del Samatar; 2018) and The White Mosque: A Memoir (2022). She lives in Virginia and teaches at James Madison University.

Matthew Sangster is Professor of Romantic Studies, Fantasy and Cultural History and Co- Director of the Centre for Fantasy and the Fantastic at the University of Glasgow.  His most recent book, An Introduction to Fantasy, was published by Cambridge University Press in 2023.  His essays on Fantasy include work on Mervyn Peake, China Miéville and imaginary cities.  His other books include Living as an Author in the Romantic Period (2021), Institutions of Literature, 1700-1900 (co-edited with Jon Mee, 2022) and Remediating the 1820s (co-edited with Jon Mee, 2023).  He co-curated (with Zoë Wilcox) the British Library’s 2011 exhibition The Worlds of Mervyn Peake and is external curator for Fantasy: Realms of Imagination (2023-24).

Ann VanderMeer is the founder of the award-winning Buzzcity Press. She was the editor-in-chief for Weird Tales (the oldest Fantasy magazine in the world) for five years, during which she was nominated three times for the Hugo Award, winning once. She has won the British Fantasy Award, the Locus Award and the World Fantasy Award. Anthologies she has edited or co-edited include Best American Fantasy (2007 and 2008), The Thackery T. Lambshead Pocket Guide to Eccentric & Discredited Diseases (2011), The Weird: A Compendium of Dark and Strange Stories (2011), The Time Traveller’s Almanac (2013), Sisters of the Revolution (2015), The Big Book of Science Fiction (2016), Current Futures: A Sci-fi Ocean Anthology (2019), The Big Book of Classic Fantasy (2019), AVATARS INC. (2020) and The Big Book of Modern Fantasy (2020). She currently works as an acquiring editor at Tor.com. Ann lives with her husband Jeff and their cat Neo in Tallahassee, Florida.

You can get your free ticket via this Eventbrite page.

Framing Fantasy: Brian Attebery and Matthew Sangster discuss the affordances of Fantasy

To celebrate the publication of Matthew Sangster’s An Introduction to Fantasy (Cambridge University Press, 2023) and Brian Attebery’s Fantasy: How it Works (Oxford University Press, 2022) receiving the 2023 Mythopoeic Scholarship Award in Myth and Fantasy Studies, Glasgow’s Centre for Fantasy and the Fantastic invites you to an online conversation between the two authors, exploring how we can make compelling cases for Fantasy’s particular qualities and values. The discussion will take place via Zoom webinar on Thursday 5 October 2023, and will be followed by a Q&A session.

Matthew Sangster is Professor of Romantic Studies, Fantasy and Cultural History and Co-Director of the Centre for Fantasy and the Fantastic at the University of Glasgow. His new book, An Introduction to Fantasy, explores why Fantasy matters in the context of its unique affordances, its disparate pasts and its extraordinary current flourishing. His essays on Fantasy include work on Mervyn Peake, China Miéville and imaginary cities. His previous books include Living as an Author in the Romantic Period (2021), Institutions of Literature, 1700-1900 (co-edited with Jon Mee, 2022) and Remediating the 1820s (co-edited with Jon Mee, 2023). He co-curated (with Zoë Wilcox) the British Library’s 2011 exhibition The Worlds of Mervyn Peake and is external curator for the upcoming exhibition Fantasy: Realms of the Imagination (2023-4).

Brian Attebery is Emeritus Professor of English and Philosophy at Idaho State University. He won the World Fantasy Award for his editing of the Journal of the Fantastic in the Arts and has been honoured by both the Science Fiction Research Association and the Association for the Fantastic in the Arts for his scholarly work. During his time as Leverhulme Visiting Professor of Fantasy at the University of Glasgow, he helped launch the Perspectives on Fantasy book series from Bloomsbury Academic Press, which he edits along with Dimitra Fimi and Matthew Sangster. His Mythopoeic Scholarship Award for Fantasy: How It Works (2022) is his third, following previous awards for Strategies of Fantasy (1992) and Stories about Stories: Fantasy and the Remaking of Myth (2013).

Get your free ticket here!

CFP: Tolkien sessions at ICMS Kalamazoo 2024

Image courtesy of the British Library, Shelfmark: Harley 3244

The Call for Papers for the 59th International Congress on Medieval Studies in Kalamazoo, Michigan, USA (May 9-11, 2024) is now open. Proposals of papers and contributions to roundtables are due Sept. 15, 2022. The Centre for Fantasy and the Fantastic, University of Glasgow, is sponsoring the following session: 

Here Be Dragons: Tolkien at the Medieval Margins

Modality: Virtual

Boundaries, margins and marginality are expanding areas of research in contemporary fantasy studies, in which Tolkien’s work is still central. Tolkien’s medievalist fantasy is particularly ripe for a reconsideration from the perspective of the edges rather than the centre: from negotiating the borders of fantastical geographies, to contested borders of genre within the legendarium, to acknowledging the perspective of racially, culturally, and ethnically marginalised readers, fans, and scholars. This session will continue the conversation which started at the Centre for Fantasy and the Fantastic’s 2023 international conference on boundaries and margins in fantasy.

Tolkien’s medievalist fantasy shows a keen interest in boundaries and margins: from negotiating fantastical geographies and their borders, to examining liminal characters in-between political/racial/cultural boundaries, even challenging borders of traditional genres within the legendarium (fairy-tale, romance, epic, science fantasy, etc.). At the same time, contemporary fantasy and Tolkien scholarship is at last opening up towards the experiences and perspectives of racially, culturally, and ethnically marginalised readers, fans, and scholars.

We invite paper proposals that seek to examine boundaries and margins in Tolkien’s legendarium, be they textual, linguistic, geographical, embodied, or imposed. 

All proposals must be made through the Congress’s Confex system. Please carefully follow the instructions on the Congress’s Call for Papers.

Deadline: Friday 15 September 2023

CFP: Tolkien sessions at IMC Leeds 2024

CFP: Leeds 2024 IMC Tolkien Sessions 

Paper abstracts are currently being sought for the following Tolkien sessions for the International Medieval Congress at Leeds, 1-4 July 2024.  The special thematic strand of this conference will be ‘Crisis’.  See more here.

We are very pleased that the 2024 IMC Tolkien Sessions will again be sponsored by the Centre for Fantasy and the Fantastic at the University of Glasgow.

Paper submissions are being sought for the following sessions:  

Tolkien’s Medieval Sub-creation in Crisis 

This session will examine different concepts of crisis in Tolkien studies. Papers may explore the types of crises Tolkien himself created in the body of his legendarium by his revising of several keys stories and legends at different times in his lifelong work.  Papers can address the significance of these narratives and their revisions in Tolkien’s shifting ideas about the world and cultures he was inventing. Papers may also explore adaptations of Tolkien works and how they create crises in our evolving understanding of the canon of Tolkien’s work and its reception.  

Bodily Crises in Tolkien’s Medievalism 

Papers in this session can explore crises/concerns of gender and bodily difference in Tolkien’s works including sexuality and disability.  Indicative areas to be examined include the role of bodies under physical duress, punishment, injury from battle or war, as well as bodies in transformation including prosthetics, spiritual transformation (good or evil) and how bodies and body transformation from Tolkien’s works are depicted in illustrations and in films and other media.  

Racial Medievalism in Tolkien Studies – A Session Celebrating the Works of Professor Dimitra Fimi, founder of Tolkien at Leeds

Papers in this session may respond to, critique and develop key ideas regarding Tolkien’s representations of race that were first explored in Professor Dimitra Fimi’s ground-breaking 2008 book Tolkien, Race and Cultural History: From Fairies to Hobbits, which won the Mythopoeic Scholarship Award for Inklings Studies in 2010. Fimi’s evolving body of work has brought to light neglected aspects of Tolkien’s creativity and world-building, including the centrality of the Elves, the role of linguistic invention, and the relationships between race and material culture in Middle-earth This session invites papers that explore Tolkien’s contexts, racial representations and world-building through engaging with and building upon the approaches Professor Fimi has set out in her academic work.

Tolkien: Medieval Roots and Modern Branches

This continuing Tolkien at Leeds session will accommodate wider topics and new approaches to Tolkien’s medievalism, ranging from source studies and theoretical readings to comparative studies of Tolkien’s works and Middle-earth studies.  

Crises in Researching Tolkien: A Round Table 

The Annual Tolkien at Leeds roundtable will explore the current crises facing Tolkien teachers, academics and researchers in Tolkien and Middle-earth studies.  Topics can include the various adaptions of Tolkien’s works that will continue to grow with new media deals, differing thoughts on treatment of Tolkien’s race, culture and sexuality in his works and the desire of scholars to see, analyse and contextualise more of Tolkien’s remaining unpublished papers.   

  • Please submit a paper contribution title and abstract by 31 August 2023 to  Dr. Andrew Higgins (asthiggins@me.com
  • Length of abstracts: 150 words (max!)  
  • Papers will be 15-20 minutes long (3 paper sessions will be preferred) 
  • With your abstract, please include name and details of contributor (affiliation, address, and preferred e-mail address)

Puck’s Players Presents: Nicholas Stuart Gray’s The Seventh Swan

You never know where magic can be found, even in the Lowlands…

Puck’s Players Presents: Nicholas Stuart Gray’s The Seventh Swan

July 7th and 8th, Govanhill Parish Church


Poster design by Georgia Zachari

Amateur theatre company Puck’s Players present a stage production of Nicholas Stuart Gray’s The Seventh Swan. Puck’s Players was originally formed in 2020 by Centre for Fantasy and the Fantastic members Marita Arvaniti and Chris Lynch-Becher with the aim to stage and perform fantasy theatre. This is their second production, after a successful staging of Terry Pratchett’s The Truth, adapted by Steven Briggs in the summer of 2022.  

Written by beloved Scottish fantasy novelist and playwright Nicholas Stuart Gray in 1962, The Seventh Swan tells the story of Alasdair, a young man cursed with a swan’s wing for a right arm. This unique sequel to Hans Christian Andersen’s beloved fairytale “The Wild Swan” relocates the story to the clan times of 16th Central Scotland. Could Alasdair ever feel human again? Could he forget the freedom of the sky? Mixing witchcraft, family drama, and high adventure, the exploits of Alasdair, Fenella and the mercenary Ewen are a poignant blend of humour, excitement, and tragedy.

Puck’s Players promise audiences a classic family tale filled to the brim with adventure and romance, tragedy and heroism! Get your free ticket here: https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/the-seventh-swan-tickets-612262663107

This production is free, or pay what you can. Any proceeds will be used to cover production costs/pay toward future productions. If you are getting a free ticket, and want to support Puck’s Players, please visit our Ko-fi page to donate: https://ko-fi.com/pucksplayers

Cast:

  • Ewen – Diego Benedetti
  • Alasdair – Meg MacDonald
  • Lady Agnes – Gabi Matic
  • Ranald of Kinrowan – Nathan Protopapas
  • Fenella – Lark McManus
  • Hudart – Chris Lynch-Becherer
  • The Bocan – Anika Klose
  • Black Fergus – Grace Worm
  • The Spaewife – Laura Lynch-Becherer & Amber Pasternack

Directed by Marita Arvaniti 

Announcing the Wat Dryhope Award

The cover of A History Maker (1994),
by Alasdair Gray

Alasdair Gray’s novella A History Maker (1994) is set in a Scotland of the future which understands human history, past and future, in terms of the domestic household. The global economy has been transformed by the invention of a universally available green energy source, the powerplant stalk: a column of light that extends from the ground to the clouds, requiring no input or maintenance except what is provided by the local ecosphere, and capable of converting all available material into whatever a household needs, from books and minerals to china dolls. As a result, societies have rearranged themselves into small domestic units organised around individual powerplant stalks, each unit directed by a group of matriarchal ‘aunts’ whose ‘gossip’ helps them resolve every crisis faced by their community.

The men of the future amuse themselves by staging wargames between local communities, fought with real weapons and involving a sometimes spectacular body count. The book’s protagonist, Wat Dryhope, acquires cult status among the spectators of these wargames thanks to his part in winning a victory for his clan against all odds. As a result, he finds himself drawn into a worldwide plot to overthrow the matriarchy by destroying the powerplants that supply its households. Wat represents, in fact, the intrusion of history into a world that sees itself as having left history behind; history, here, being largely the product of dissatisfied men seeking to gain power by violence over as many households as they can, often because of some personal resentment caused by their upbringing. Only the matriarchs and their gossip can prevent this utopia of the future from lapsing back into its historical state of continuous warfare.

The intrusion of history into a settled world is also, for Gray, the realisation of story. Hailed as a hero, Wat stands in danger of coming to embody the desire of certain men and women to transfer their fantasies wholesale from the space of storytelling into the public and private spheres, with consequences as disastrous as you might expect if you like to read action adventures or indulge in extravagant fantasies. Mark Twain, among others, shared this awareness of the disastrous effects of confusing the real and the fantastic, ascribing the American Civil War to the passion of Southern Gentlemen for reading the romances of Sir Walter Scott, and for imposing the terms of those romances unchanged on their unfortunate nation. Gray’s world of the future, set in the Scottish landscape quite close to Scott’s home in Abbotsford, involves instead a constant interplay between fantasy and reality, and so invites us to consider how best to achieve a healthy relationship between the two. Gray politicizes fantasy, in other words, and encourages his thinking readers to do the same.

Alasdair Gray
Image Courtesy The Alasdair Gray Archive

Wat Dryhope is not simply an embodiment of toxic masculinity or imperialist self-delusion. He also represents a resistance to complacency: dreams and fantasies as stimulants to reflection, invention, needful transformation. His disruption of the matriarchy leads it to needful self-reformation, giving new creative functions to the men who had formerly been wasting their lives in pointless combat. And he ends his life as a wandering Gangrel: one of those travellers whose philosophy of constant movement and debate challenges the self-satisfaction of the settlements they refuse to settle in. His first name recalls both ‘Walter’, invoking the internationally acclaimed and notoriously conservative writer of romances, and Wat Tyler, the leader of the fourteenth-century peasant’s revolt whose life was an inspiration to the socialist writer-artist William Morris. His second name summons up both the old word wanhope – despair, depression, despondency – and the conviction that the green shoots of hope can spring from the driest of grounds (‘For there is hope of a tree, if it be cut down, that it will sprout again, and that the tender branch thereof will not cease’; ‘Thus saith the Lord GOD unto these bones; Behold, I will cause breath to enter into you, and ye shall live’). Like most of us, and like the fantasy genre, he is a thing of contrasts.

The Wat Dryhope Award is intended to reward thought on fantasy. To this end it is presented annually to the best-performing student in the MLitt English Literature: Fantasy at the University of Glasgow. The Centre for Fantasy and the Fantastic thanks the Estate of Alasdair Gray for giving us permission to name the award after one of his quirkiest and most unsettling protagonists.

CFP: Tolkien and Fantasy sessions at ICMS Kalamazoo 2023

The Call for Papers for the 58th International Congress on Medieval Studies in Kalamazoo, Michigan, USA (May 11–May 13, 2023) is now open. Proposals of papers and contributions to roundtables are due Sept. 15, 2022. The Centre for Fantasy and the Fantastic, University of Glasgow, is sponsoring two sessions: 

Tolkien and Medieval Constructions of Race (A Roundtable)

Organised by: Mariana Rios Maldonado
Modality: Virtual

British Library, Royal 19 D I f. 65: Saracens and Christians

The construction of race in J.R.R. Tolkien’s Middle-earth narratives, legendarium, and their adaptations represents even now a gap within Tolkien scholarship. The adverse reactions to the 2021 Tolkien Society’s “Tolkien and Diversity” Seminar and the diverse casting of the upcoming Lord of the Rings series highlight the pressing importance of addressing this subject from all areas of Tolkien scholarship, including medieval studies. This roundtable will bring these discussions to the forefront, with special consideration towards the ground-breaking, critical inputs by medievalists of colour and the field’s intersection with postcolonial theory. Contributions from all scholarly approaches are welcome.

Ursula K. Le Guin’s Marvelous Medievalism

Organised by: Kristine A. Swank
Modality: In person (in Kalamazoo, MI)

Ursula K. Le Guin
Photo by Eileen Gunn

Ursula K. Le Guin (1929–2018) left an unparalleled legacy of masterworks in science fiction and fantasy. Several of her imagined worlds were founded upon or enriched by global medieval influences from Europe, Asia, North & South America. This paper session will explore and examine some of Le Guin’s marvelous medievalisms, her sources and influences, and their effects on her fiction. Papers might employ any scholarly approach. Possible texts include Always Coming Home, Annals of the Western Shore (Gifts, Voices, Powers), The Beginning Place, Earthsea series, Eye of the Heron, Hainish cycle, Lavinia, Orsinian Tales, and Le Guin’s short stories.

All proposals must be made through the Congress’s Confex system. Please carefully follow the instructions on the Congress’s Call for Papers.

CFP: Tolkien sessions at IMC Leeds 2023

Paper abstracts are currently being sought for the following Tolkien sessions for the International Medieval Congress at Leeds, 3-6 July 2023.  The special thematic strand of this conference will be Networks and Entanglements.  See more here https://www.imc.leeds.ac.uk/imc-2023/

We are very pleased that the 2023 IMC Tolkien Sessions will again be sponsored by the Centre for Fantasy and the Fantastic at the University of Glasgow.

Paper submissions are being sought for the following sessions:

Tolkien: Medieval Roots and Modern Branches

This session can accommodate wider topics and new approaches to Tolkien’s medievalism, ranging from source studies and theoretical readings, to comparative studies of Tolkien’s works. 

Tolkien’s Medieval Entanglements 

Throughout his life and academic work Tolkien explored and grappled with some of the most perplexing and interesting cruxes and entanglements of medieval literature and language.  This session will explore examples of Tolkien’s engagement with these ‘medieval entanglements’ and how he sought potential solutions for them through both his own academic research and fictional worldbuilding. 

Tolkien’s Work and Academic Networks at Leeds

J.R.R. Tolkien established his academic career at the University of Leeds, joining as a Reader in 1920, aged 28, before being promoted to Professor within a few years. By the time he left in 1925 he had established the School as a UK leader in Old Icelandic language and literature.  Papers in this session can explore elements of Tolkien’s academic as well as fictional work while he was at the University of Leeds.  Papers can also explore the work of colleagues that formed part of Tolkien’s academic network(s) while he was at Leeds.   

New Work and Methods in Tolkien Research – Making the Links

Papers in this session can explore new methods of academic research that can be applied to both Tolkien and Middle-earth studies and what these methodologies are revealing for the continuing academic dialogue around Tolkien and both his academic and fictional works.  

Disentangling the Second Age of Middle-earth

In Tolkien’s great masterwork The Lord of the Rings, the Second Age of Middle-earth is a time remembered in poetry and song and the memories of such witnesses to its history as Elrond and Galadriel. In this session we are seeking papers that deal specifically with elements of the history, peoples and events of the Second Age of Middle-earth which saw the rise of the great evil that would cast its shadow over Middle-earth in the Third Age.  Papers in this session can be in dialogue with the upcoming Amazon Prime The Lord of the Rings: Rings of Power series as well as the new book The Fall of Númenor And Other Tales from the Second Age of Middle-earth which will be published by HarperCollins in November 2022.

The Lord of the Rings: Rings of Power and Questions of Adaptation and Authenticity – A Round Table 

Our continuing Tolkien at Leeds Round Table series will explore one of the most significant new adaptations of Tolkien’s works, Amazon Prime’s The Lord of the Rings: Rings of Power series.  Participants will offer short presentations on some element of this series and how it is (or is not) in dialogue with Tolkien’s texts and what this new adaptation develops or reveals in the expanding body of adaptations of Tolkien’s world-building.   

  • Please submit a paper contribution title and abstract by 31 August 2022 to  Dr. Andrew Higgins (asthiggins@me.com)
  • Length of abstracts: 150 words (max!) 
  • Papers will be 15-20 minutes long
  • With your abstract, please include name and details of contributor (affiliation, address, and preferred e-mail address)

CFP: When it Changed: Women in SF/F Since 1972 (3-4 Dec 2022)

Keynote Speakers: Cheryl Morgan and Joy Sanchez-Taylor

To mark the 50th anniversary of Joanna Russ’s landmark short story, ‘When It Changed’, the Science Fiction Foundation, and the Centre for Fantasy and the Fantastic and Games and Gaming Lab the University of Glasgow are proposing an online conference on women’s role in reshaping science fiction.

Fifty years after Russ’s game-changing story, the major sf/f prizes are being won by women, among them N.K. Jemisin, Mary Robinette Kowal, Laura Jean McKay and Martha Wells. To these we can add the posthumous success of Octavia E. Butler and the mainstream acclaim of writers such as Susanna Clarke. Despite such controversies as ‘Puppygate’, sf/f now appears to be a more inclusive place, partly because of the role played by women.

If sf/f has indeed changed, in what ways did women help to cause this happen? On the other hand, does the glamour of sales and literary prizes for a few select authors disguise structural inequities within sf/f that endure from the 1970s? We invite papers of 20 minutes in length that will debate these questions. Possible topics may include (but are not limited to):

  • Imagining post-patriarchal futures
  • Lesbian, non-binary and trans representations
  • Women and Indigenous futurisms
  • Women and technoculture
  • Disability studies and the medical humanities
  • Women, ecology and the ‘Manthropocene’
  • Space opera and planetary romance
  • Sf/f and Young Adult fiction
  • Women and the graphic novel
  • Video, table-top and role-playing games
  • Fanzines and fan cultures
  • Modes of production and consumption – women as editors, reviewers, publishers
  • Feminist presses and imprints
  • The New Wave and literary experimentalism
  • The role of the female auteur in sf music and cinema
  • Women and sf/f criticism and theory
  • Exploding the sf/f canon – re-visioning sf/f histories
  • Sf/f and social/digital media
  • Transmedia and adaptation studies
  • Canonisation and the role of literary awards

Proposals of up to 250 words with a bionote of 50 words should be submitted to Dr Paul March-Russell (paulmarchrussell@gmail.com) by 9 August 2022. We are also interested in ideas for panels on special topics related to the conference theme. A selection of papers will be published in the winter 2023 issue of Foundation.

Fantasy and Puppetry: Animating the Fantastic – Videos and Reading List

Our Fantasy and Puppetry event celebrated the art of puppets and puppeteers in bringing fantasy and the fantastic to life, on stage, on screen and on the page. If you missed it, you can watch all sessions below. You will also find here a reading list of texts mentioned during these sessions!

Fantasy and Puppetry (Film): Brian and Wendy Froud, interviewed by Terri Windling:

Bringing Fantasy Creatures to Life : William Todd-Jones, interviewed by Terri Windling:

Bringing Fantasy Creatures to Life (Theatre): Howard Gayton:

Panel on Puppets and Puppetry in Fantasy Narratives:


Reading/Viewing Recommendations



The two lists below were collated from the Zoom comments during all of the Fantasy and Puppetry sessions. Recommendations are listed in alphabetical order and are copied directly from the comments of attendees.

Puppeteers, Practitioners, and Theatre Companies  

More Text and Media Recommendations