Fantasy and Puppetry: Animating the Fantastic

On April 1 2022 – April Fool’s Day – the Centre for Fantasy and the Fantastic at the University of Glasgow will be hosting a very special online event. Fantasy and Puppetry is a celebration of the art of puppets and puppeteers in bringing fantasy and the fantastic to life, on stage, on screen and on the page. It will feature five of the most exciting and celebrated puppet-centred artists, writers, puppeteers and performers working in the world today: Brian and Wendy Froud, Howard Gayton, Mary Robinette Kowal and William Todd-Jones, all brought together by their friendship with World Fantasy Award-winning writer, editor and artist Terri Windling. Between them, these artists have been closely involved in some of the finest fantasy films, movies, TV series and stage performances of the last forty years: The Dark Crystal, Labyrinth, the Muppet movies, Sesame Street, The Empire Strikes Back, Dark Crystal – The Age of Resistance, His Dark Materials, John Carter of Mars, The Neverending Story, Who Framed Roger Rabbit – the list is seemingly endless. Join us, with our Master of Ceremonies Terri Windling, to discover how their skills as designers, craftspeople and puppeteers have interacted with their skills as storytellers to animate lifeless matter and awake the world’s imagination!

See full programme below!

Click here to book your free ticket!

Brian Froud (artist and conceptual designer)

Brian and Wendy Froud

Brian Froud is a world-renowned painter and film designer whose portrayal of faeries and the Faerie Realm has influenced a whole generation of artists, writers, filmmakers, and folklorists. Raised in Kent, he studied illustration at Maidstone College of Art, and began his career as an illustrator in London (in the same studio as Alan Lee). He then turned to making books of his own, and designing films – most famously, the now-classic children’s films The Dark Crystal and Labyrinth (both produced by Jim Henson). Brian’s art has been exhibited in museums and galleries around the world, written about in scholarly texts, and won numerous awards. His internationallybestselling books include Faeries (with Alan Lee), the Lady Cottington Pressed Fairies series (with Terry Jones and Ari Berk), Good Faeries/Bad Faeries (with Terri Windling) The Runes of Elfland (with Ari Berk), Brian Froud’s Goblins (with Ari Berk), How to See Faeries (with John Matthews), and Brian Froud’s World of Faerie – all of them inspired by the legends, lore, and landscape of Dartmoor. His recent books, Trolls, and Faeries’ Tales explore the lives and history of the elusive trolls and faeries; they were created in collaboration with his wife, author and artist Wendy Froud. Brian’s latest project is the Netflix series Dark Crystal – The Age of Resistance. Brian, Wendy and their son, Toby, all worked on the series. Brian and Wendy live near Chagford in a seventeenth-century Devon longhouse filled with books, art, goblins, and faeries.

https://www.ferniebrae.com/brian-froud

Wendy Froud (doll artist, sculptor, puppet-maker and writer)

Brian and Wendy Froud (and friends!)

Wendy Froud is a sculptor, writer, and one of the most revered doll artists in the world today. The daughter of two artists, she was born and raised in Detroit, Michigan, where she studied art and design at the Center for Creative Studies. She began her career as a sculptor on the set of The Muppet Show in New York,and went on to work on such feature films as The Dark Crystal, Labyrinth and The Empire Strikes Back (for which she sculpted and fabricated Yoda). Wendy’s doll art and mythic sculptures have been extensively exhibited, published in three children’s books (A Midsummer Night’s Faery Tale, The Winter Child, The Faeries of Spring Cottage), and featured in an art book, The Art of Wendy Froud. As a writer, her work has been published in The Heart of the Faerie Oracle, Troll’s Eye View, the Cottington series, and other magical volumes – including her latest books, Trolls and Faeries Tales, created in collaboration with her husband, ‘faery painter’ Brian Froud. Wendy and Brian live in old thatched farmhouse in the Devon countryside. Wendy, Brian and Toby have worked together on the Emmy winning Netflix series Dark Crystal – The Age of Resistance, and are currently working on a few new projects in development.

https://www.ferniebrae.com/wendy-froud

Howard Gayton (theatre director, performer, scholar and teacher, puppeteer)

Howard Gayton

Howard Gayton has worked for over thirty years as a theatre director, performer, and teacher specialising in puppetry, foolery, and Commedia dell’Arte; his work is inspired by all manner of mythic tricksters, zanni figures, jesters, buffoons, and sacred clowns. He has directed and performed many puppet shows for the acclaimed Little Angel Theatre in London, as well as for Norwich Puppet Theatre, Light Theatre at the Eden Project and other venues; he teaches glove puppets at The Curious School of Puppetry and tours a traditional Punch & Judy show. Howard was the co-founder of Ophaboom, a Commedia company which toured across Europe for twenty years; he is now co-director of Columbina Theatre, with playwright Peter Oswald. He recently completed a 500-mile theatrical pilgrimage, walking from London to the Climate Change Conference in Glasgow, and is currently researching The Esoteric Art of the Fool at the University of Exeter.

https://endicottstudio.typepad.com/howardgayton/

Mary Robinette Kowal (Hugo, Nebula and John W Campbell award-winning novelist and short story writer, puppeteer)

Mary Robinette Kowal with cat Sadie and puppet Lee!

Mary Robinette Kowal is an author, a professional puppeteer and voice actor (SAG/AFTRA). Mary Robinette has performed for LazyTown (CBS), the Center for Puppetry Arts, Jim Henson Pictures, Sesame Street, and founded Other Hand Productions. Her designs have garnered two UNIMA-USA Citations of Excellence, the highest award an American puppeteer can achieve. She records fiction for authors such as Seanan McGuire, Cory Doctorow and John Scalzi. Her own fiction has won multiple Hugo Awards, as well as Nebula, John W Campbell and Locus Awards. Mary Robinette lives in Nashville with her husband Rob and over a dozen manual typewriters.

maryrobinettekowal.com

William Todd-Jones (master puppeteer, puppet-designer, performer, movement consultant and writer)

William Tod-Jones

Todd began his career as a builder and performer of puppets for Jim Henson’s film Labyrinth. Other award-winning projects include Harry Potter VWho Framed Roger Rabbit, various Muppet movies, Batman, Hitchhikers Guide to the Galaxy, John Carter of Mars and many others. He travelled the world as the Master Puppeteer and Manny performer of the Monlove/Stage Entertainment touring show Ice Age Live. Todd established the ground-breaking and award-winning Creature FX department for the BBC/HBO TV series His Dark Materials.  In recent years, he has specialised in combining the disciplines of puppetry and computer graphic animation, developing techniques in optical motion capture, performance animation and digital puppetry. He is determined to use art in the service of the environment, drawing people’s attention to our dependency on nature. ‘Puppets are not about the person performing but about the person looking’ (William Todd-Jones).

Terri Windling (writer, editor, artist)

Terri Windling

Terri Windling is a writer, editor, and artist specialising in fantasy literature, folklore, and mythic arts. She has published over forty books (The Wood Wife, etc.), receiving nine World Fantasy Awards, the Mythopoeic Award, the Bram Stoker Award, and the SFWA’s Solstice Award for ‘outstanding contributions to the speculative fiction field as a writer, editor, artist, educator, and mentor’. She writes fiction for adults and children, nonfiction on folklore and fantasy topics, and a mythic arts blog (Myth & Moor). She has edited fantasy fiction since the 1980s, working with many of the major writers in the field, and she’s published numerous anthologies for adult and young readers, including the sixteen volumes of The Year’s Best Fantasy & Horror series co-edited with Ellen Datlow. Being married to puppeteer, she has a particular interest in the ways puppetry is portrayed in fantasy texts.

http://www.terriwindling.com/

Marita Arvaniti (student, theatre practitioner, scholar)

Marita Arvaniti is a Greek PhD student at the University of Glasgow, investigating the representations of theatre in contemporary Faery Fantasy literature. She holds a BA in Theatre Studies from the National Kapodistrian University of Athens and an MLitt in Fantasy Literature from the University of Glasgow. Marita is a member of the University of Glasgow’s Centre for Fantasy and the Fantastic, and the Administrative Assistant for the Once and Future Fantasies Conference. She is currently working as an archivist with Company of Wolves, a Glasgow based laboratory theatre company, and directs fantasy plays with the amateur theatre group Puck’s Players.

Programme

11: 00 am: Fantasy and Puppetry (Film)

Brian and Wendy Froud, interviewed by Terri Windling

A whole generation of filmmakers, puppeteers, and fantasists have been profoudly influenced by Brian and Wendy Froud: through their bewitching art, their best-selling books (Faeries, Trolls, Lady Cottington’s Pressed Fairy Book, etc.), and their ground-breaking work on the Jim Henson puppet films The Dark Crystal and Labyrinth. In this wide-ranging discussion, Brian and Wendy will talk about their extensive work on the original Dark Crystal film, as well as on the recent Netflix television series, Dark Crystal: The Age of Resistance. We’ll learn about the creation of the goblin world of Labyrinth, of Yoda for The Empire Strikes Back, and of other creatures for film and stage, while discussing the artistic techniques and philosophies that imbue these characters with vibrancy, authenticity, and soul. We’ll explore the distinctive nature of “Froudian” magic, rooted in the ancient landscape of Dartmoor, and we’ll talk about why this kind of enchantment is so important in the world today. Come join us for art and conversation, with a question-and-answer session at the end.

12.30-1.30 pm: Lunch

1.30 pm: Bringing Fantasy Creatures to Life (Film, TV, Stage)

William Todd-Jones, interviewed by Terri Windling

Puppet designer and performer William Todd-Jones has spent many years bringing fantastical creatures to life for film, TV, and large stage shows. In a discussion with writer-artist Terri Windling, he discusses the techniques and methods he uses for each of these mediums, not only in productions where puppets take centre stage (Labyrinth, The Adventures of PinnochioThe Muppet Movies, etc.), but also those in which behind-the-scenes puppetry is used to create visual magic onscreen. For the BBC/HBO adaptation of Philip Pullman’s His Dark Materials, for example, he was the Beast Master in charge of the puppets on which the animated ‘daemons’ were based. He’ll explain this process with photos and clips from the set, showing how a fantasy concept is translated into screen drama.

3.00 pm: Bringing Fantasy Creatures to Life (Theatre)

Howard Gayton

In this talk/demonstration, director and performer Howard Gayton invites us into his studio to show how puppeteers create magic in live theatre settings using the traditional tools of the trade: glove puppets, rod puppets, etc.. He’ll discuss the process of turning folk tales and other magical stories (The Selkie Bride, The Musicians of BremenKing Arthur, Jack and the Beanstalk) into puppet shows for children, and fantasy texts (such as Angela Carter’s story The Bloody Chamber) into puppet shows for adults. He’ll introduce us to such classic figures as Punch and Judy, and the stock characters of a puppet Commedia troupe, and demonstrate how to breathe life and spirit into objects made of wood and cloth.

4.00-4:30 pm Break

4.30-6.00 pm: Panel on Puppets and Puppetry in Fantasy Narratives (Novels, Film, TV)

Terri Windling, Mary Robinette Kowal, Marita Arvaniti, Rob Maslen

Puppets are often used to create the fantastic in performance, but magically animated puppets also feature in fantasy books for adults and children: think of Angela Carter’s The Magic Toyshop, Carlo Collodi’s Pinocchio, Susan Cooper’s The Magician’s Boy, Neil Gaiman and Dave McKean’s Mr Punch,Russell Hoban’s Riddley Walker, Mary Robinette Kowal’s ‘Body Language’, and Diana Wynne Jones’s The Magicians of Caprona. This panel will consider the history and power of the puppet in fantasy narratives, from novels, short stories, comics and picture books to film and TV.

CFP: Medical Humanities and the Fantastic Online Symposium: Neurodiversity and Disability

Medical Humanities and the Fantastic Online Symposium: Neurodiversity and Disability

Friday 11th  February 2022

Keynote lectures from Dr Ria Cheyne and Dr Louise Creechan

The second Medical Humanities and the Fantastic Symposium, funded by the University of Glasgow’s Centre for Medical Humanities’ Early Career Foundation Award, and co-hosted by the Centre for Fantasy and the Fantastic, continues to map and establish new ways of connecting research into the fantastic (traditionally understood as science fiction, fantasy and horror) and popular culture with the field of the medical humanities. It aims to showcase the potentials the fantastic has to offer as valuable gateway and perspective for discussing medical encounters, practices and lived experiences. The fantastic as a research method can expand the scope of the medical humanities since its modus operandi relies on reframing human understanding of the world, particularly the human condition and its relationship to technology, society, and the environment. Likewise, medical humanities offer emerging trajectories to approach the fantastic.

This time the symposium intends to focus on a specific area, and its theme is set as “Neurodiversity and Disability”, seeking to explore and formulating answers the following questions:

  • How does the fantastic represent or subvert neurodiversity and disability?
  • How can the fantastic help express lived experiences of neurodiversity and disability?
  • How can the fantastic negotiate the reframing of current medical, social, political and economic debates surrounding neurodiversity and disability?
  • How can the fantastic raise awareness, and facilitate critical and policy intervention?

We are inviting 10-15-minute presentations (including work-in-progress projects) relating to but not limited to the following topics:

  • Ableism
  • Academia
  • Activism
  • ADHD, ASD
  • Anthropocene
  • Art and artistic practices
  • Care and care crisis
  • Capitalism and anti-capitalism
  • Children’s literature
  • Chronic illness and chronic pain
  • Comics and graphic novels
  • Communities online and offline
  • Creativity
  • Dis/ability
  • Ecology, ecopsychology, ecosickness
  • Education
  • Fantasy
  • Fantastic franchises
  • Film and television
  • Gaming and gamification
  • Gender
  • Gothic and Horror
  • History and medical history
  • Learning disabilities
  • Modernism and Postmodernism
  • Neurodiversity and the Neurodiversity Movement
  • Posthumanism
  • Precarity
  • Reproductive health
  • Robotics
  • Science fiction and speculative fiction
  • Sex and sexuality
  • Social media
  • Technology
  • Theatre
  • Vulnerability
  • Weird fiction
  • Young Adult

Please send your short abstract (100-200 words) accompanied by a brief bio (50-100 words) by the end of January 2022 as well as any enquiries and concerns to fantastic.medhums@gmail.com. For information and updates on the event follow @fantastic_mhs on Twitter.

Registration for this Symposium is now open! You can register here.

Conference: Dissenting Beliefs: Heresy and Heterodoxy in Fantasy

The Centre for Fantasy and the Fantastic and the University of Glasgow are happy to announce Dissenting Beliefs, an early career researcher conference on religious heresy and heterodoxy in fantasy literature and media. The conference is free to attend and will be held online via Zoom webinars on 11 December 2021.

Our keynote lecture for the conference will be delivered by Prof. Alana M. Vincent, Professor of Jewish Philosophy, Religion and Imagination at the University of Chester.

You can find the conference CFP here and find our full programme below.

Registration is already open – here is the link to book your free ticket.

Keep up with our latest updates by following Dissenting Beliefs on Facebook and Twitter.

Organising Committee:

Dr Taylor Driggers
Lucinda Holdsworth
Meg MacDonald
Luise Rössel

Contact Email: Dissenting.Beliefs@gmail.com

Programme:

9:30-10:00: Welcome and Opening Words


10:00-11:30: Panel 1: Feminist Mythic Counter Readings
Chloe Campbell — “Hell’s Under New Management Now”: Heresy, Patriarchy and Religious Subversion in The Chilling Adventures of Sabrina

Eilidh Harrower — “Pharmakis”: Feminist Paganism in Circe by Madeline Miller

Grace Worm — In the Hands of the Goddess: Feminist Religion, Religious Piety, and Mistaken Interpretations in Tamora Pierce’s Tortall and Other Lands

10:00-11:30: Panel 2: Good Omens and its Descendants
Alex Booer— A Theology from the Margins: The Demon Crowley in TV’s Good Omens

Luise Roessel— Mirroring “sacred” textuality only to break it: the liberating power of Terry Pratchett and Neil Gaiman’s Good Omens

Matthew Konerth— The Demon Ascendant Narrative

11:30-11:45: Break


11:45-13:15: Panel 3: Fantastic Queer Heterodoxies
Marita Arvanti — God Has An Asshole?: Queer Heterodoxies in Elizabeth Bear’s Stratford Man duology

Koh Hui Ling Carina — Postmodern Fantasy and Queer Theology in Samantha Shannon’s The Priory of the Orange Tree

Da Eun Kun — Oranges Are Not the Only Fruit and Blakean Fantasies for a Lesbian Feminist Subject


11:45-13:15: Panel 4: Interwar Paganism and Occultism
Andrew Korah — “To Pray to the Stars”: The Nonmoral Devotion to Beauty in Dunsany’s Fantasy

Georgia Van Raalte — “The Ass that Carries the Ark”: Fantasy, Initiation and Goddess Theology in Dion Fortune’s Occult Novels

Sean Martin — Gnostic and Pagan Archetypes in David Lindsay’s The Violet Apple, Devil’s Tor and The Witch


13:15-14:00: Lunch Break


14:00-15:40: Panel 5: Interreligious and Intercultural Dialogue
Anna Milon — The High Church of the Goddess: Religious Syncretism in Live Action Role Play.

Smita Dhantal — A Socio-Psychological Analysis of Interreligious Dialogue in A Song of Ice and Fire

Snigdha Basu — Theological subversion of the indigenous and trails of Womanist theology in Joanne Harris’s Chocolat

Venetta Octavia — Fantasy or History: Religion vs. Magic


15:40-17:10: Keynote with Prof. Alana Vincent

CFP: Dissenting Beliefs: Heresy and Heterodoxy in Fantasy

Online Conference to be held on 11 December 2021, supported by the Centre for Fantasy and the Fantastic, University of Glasgow.

Deadline for Submissions: 7th September 2021

Organising Committee:

Dr Taylor Driggers
Lucinda Holdsworth
Meg MacDonald
Luise Rössel

Contact Email: Dissenting.Beliefs@gmail.com

Twitter: https://twitter.com/DissentCon/

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/DissentCon/

Keynote

Alana M. Vincent is the Professor of Jewish Philosophy, Religion and Imagination at the University of Chester. Her published work engages a wide range of topics relating to religion, memory, and cultural imaginaries, from commemorations of mass killing to the afterlives of biblical texts. She has published several monographs, including Culture, Communion and Recovery: Tolkienian Fairy-Story and Inter-Religious Exchange (2014), and is currently researching the way that popular narratives, such as comic books and superhero movies, shape public perceptions of post-genocide reconciliation. Born in Canada, she currently resides in Liverpool with her partner and two cats.

Call for Papers

Religious fantasy, for a great many readers, is synonymous with Christian fantasy; more specifically, it is understood as literature overtly reproducing biblical narratives within a fantasy world, such as C. S. Lewis’ The Chronicles of Narnia. Concurrently, fantasy texts engaging with theology through non-allegorical means that challenge mainstream Christian doctrine are all too often dismissed as disingenuous, offensive or deliberately antagonistic. While this is sometimes the case, such a narrow view of religious fantasy excludes all but the least innovative texts from the genre and leaves little room for authors of other faiths. Furthermore, the dominance of texts affirming orthodoxy in religious fantasy discourse threatens to blind us to another side of belief: that radical, sometimes even heretical, literary reconfigurations of religion can also be acts of devotion.

If religious fantasy is instead allowed to encompass heterodoxy and heresy, theological subversions and expressions of misotheism, then the affordances of religious fantasy expand far beyond the didacticism popularly attributed to it. Understood in these terms, religious fantasy can be used: to affirm one’s identity and spiritual worth in opposition to official doctrines which may deny it, as a tool of protest against unjust systems of power, to explore complex spiritual responses to historical instances of religious complicity in atrocities, or to express lived spiritual experiences which do not conform to orthodox teachings.

This online conference, supported by the Centre for Fantasy and the Fantastic, University of Glasgow, aims to explore the wide ranging affordances of heterodoxy and heresy in fantasy texts across a wide range of faiths. We welcome 20-minute papers from postgraduate students and early career researchers working in any area of fantasy or theology. These papers might address, but are not limited to, the following topics:

  • Queer, feminist and womanist theology in fantasy
  • Non-Western, post-colonial or anti-colonial heresies and fantasy
  • Misotheism, ‘New’ Atheism and Death of God theology in fantasy
  • Fantasy and interreligious dialogue
  • The affordances of fantasy in theologies of protest
  • New Media’s interactions with fantasy and theology, and how this might differ from traditional media

Please submit a 300 word abstract and a short bio (maximum 150 words) to Dissenting.Beliefs@gmail.com with the subject line ‘Abstract Submission’ by 31st August. Only applications from graduate students and early career researchers will be considered for this conference. We are particularly keen to highlight the contributions of underrepresented authors within the fantasy genre at this conference, therefore we will also not be accepting submissions on the works of J. R. R. Tolkien, C. S. Lewis, J. K. Rowling or Philip Pullman.

This event will take place online on 11th December 2021 and will be made accessible to the public via both zoom and the Centre for Fantasy and the Fantastic’s YouTube channel.

CFP: Tolkien and Fantasy sessions at ICMS, Kalamazoo

We are seeking abstracts for two sessions on J.R.R. Tolkien and Young Adult Fantasy, sponsored by the Centre for Fantasy and the Fantastic, for the 57th International Congress on Medieval Studies (Kalamazoo, Western Michigan University), to be held online on 9-14 May 2022.

Tolkien and the Medieval Animal

Organised by Kris Swank

The emerging field of “animal studies” shifts critical thought away from an assumption of human supremacy and instead explores the web of interdependence that enmeshes humans with all other forms of life (Crane 2015: 1). As Anna Tsing puts it, “Human nature is an interspecies relationship” (2012: 144). But these conceptions are not new. Susan Crane writes, “The people of medieval Britain lived in daily contact with domestic and wild animals. Forest and wasteland loomed over settlements, and even city streets teemed with all kinds of creatures” (2012: 1).

The medieval animal is explored in a number of recent monographs, e.g. Animals in the Middle Ages by Nona C. Flores (2000), The Beast Within: Animals in the Middle Ages, 2nd ed., by Joyce E. Salisbury (2010), Animal Encounters: Contacts and Concepts in Medieval Britain by Susan Crane (2012), and Medieval Pets by Kathleen Walker-Meikle (2021), among others. Animals mattered to J.R.R. Tolkien, too, and his writings frequently engage with medieval conceptions of the interspecies relationships between humans and non-human animals. A few examples include Farmer Giles and his dog, Garm, Gandalf and Shadowfax, and bestiary animals Fastitocalon, the Oliphaunt, and dragons. Lists of animals found in Middle-earth are available online (e.g. here and here).

We welcome proposals for this paper session on “Tolkien and the Medieval Animal.” Interdisciplinary topics are welcome, and scholars might engage with a number of diverse fields, such as anthropology, art history, biology, communication, geography, history, literary studies, philosophy, psychology, sociology, etc. Panelists may also employ various theoretical perspectives.

For any questions on this session please contact Kris Swank at 2464732s@student.gla.ac.uk.

The Global Middle Ages in Young Adult Fantasy

Organised by Grace Ann Thomas Worm

Contemporary trends in Young Adult fantasy literature demonstrate a close relationship between young adult stories and a global medieval settings. Young Adult fantasies often use medieval settings to position arguments around identity, race, culture, class, gender, ethnicity, sexuality, violence, environmentalism, technology, folklore, and magic. We want to open a conversation about the turn toward a Global Middle Ages in Young Adult fantasy and its opportunities and challenges for new voices, groups, cultures, and readers.

Since the days of J.R.R. Tolkien and C.S. Lewis, settings for fantasy novels have largely been modelled upon the medieval North: the British Isles and Scandinavia. In the last decade, a wave of emerging voices in the field of Young Adult fantasy have turned to the rich variety of cultural models, mythologies, and folklore traditions of the “Global Middle Ages,” that is pre-modern Africa, Asia, the Americas, Austronesia, even eastern and southern Europe. Among this wave of authors who write on global medievalism are Tomi Adeyemi, Renée Ahdieh, P. Djèlí Clark, Hafsah Faizal, Julie Kagawa, Nnedi Okrafor, Rebecca Roanhorse, Nghi Vo, Neon Yang, and many others.

We want to reveal not only cultures which have previously been silenced, but also groups which have been silenced, including women, the enslaved, indigenous peoples, queer, or disabled groups.

For any questions on this session please contact Grace Worm at g.worm.1@research.gla.ac.uk.

How to submit your abstract

All proposals must be submitted through the International Congress on Medieval Studies site: https://wmich.edu/medievalcongress/call

The proposal deadline is 15 September 2021

References

Crane, S. (2012). Animal Encounters: Contacts and Concepts in Medieval Britain (University of Pennsylvania Press).

Tsing, A. (2012). Unruly Edges: Mushrooms as Companion Species: for Donna Haraway. Environmental Humanities 1, available at: https://read.dukeupress.edu/environmental-humanities/article/1/1/141/8082/Unruly-Edges-Mushrooms-as-Companion-SpeciesFor

Crane, S. (2015). ‘Medieval Animal Studies: Dogs at Work’. Oxford Handbooks Online, available at: https://www.oxfordhandbooks.com/view/10.1093/oxfordhb/9780199935338.001.0001/oxfordhb-9780199935338-e-103

Image Credits

Man with hunting dogs. Marginal drawing from Luttrell Psalter. Originally published in England East Anglia; circa 1325-1335. Photograph from Encyclopædia Britannica ImageQuest, 2 Mar 2017.

Medieval Cosplaying. @ Grace Worm

Call for British Academy Postdoctoral Fellowships candidates on fantasy

The Centre for Fantasy and the Fantastic at the University of Glasgow is inviting expressions of interest from candidates who are considering applying for a British Academy Postdoctoral Fellowship focusing on research projects on fantasy/the fantastic.

Given the highly competitive nature of this scheme, the College of Arts at the University of Glasgow has put in place an internal process to select, and then closely support, potential candidates to be put forward with the University of Glasgow.  The Centre for Fantasy and the Fantastic is keen to support excellent research projects on fantasy that might attract funding from the BA scheme. Therefore we are seeking to identify, at an early stage, candidates whom we would be keen to mentor. We will offer them tailored support in preparing an application for the College selection process.

The British Academy application process is in two stages: The deadline for Outline applications is anticipated to be in mid-October 2021 (date tbc by the British Academy). The deadline for the second stage (by invitation only) is usually mid-February. The College of Arts internal deadline for UofG candidates is going to be towards the end of August 2021 (date tbc by College of Arts).

If you are interested in applying with a research project that focuses on fantasy/the fantastic, please send a CV and a draft of the research proposal part of the BA application by Thursday 15th July 2021 to arts-fantasy@glasgow.ac.uk.

From Spare Oom to War Drobe: A Journey to Narnia with Katherine Langrish

Join us for a journey to Narnia! In her just-published book From Spare Oom to War Drobe: Travels in Narnia with my Nine-Year-Old Self, celebrated children’s and young adult fantasy author Katherine Langrish has revisited her childhood reading of C. S. Lewis’s Chronicles of Narnia series to explore what enchanted her in the books as a young reader, and ask whether they still have the power to do so. Hand in hand with her nine year-old self, Katherine traces many paths through Lewis’s thick forest of allusions not only to Christianity, but to Plato, fairy tales, myths, legends, medieval romances, renaissance poetry and indeed to other children’s books. She juxtaposes two very different ways of reading the Narnia stories: the adult, informed, rational way and the passionate childish way.

Join Katherine and the Centre for Fantasy and the Fantastic co-directors Dr Robert Maslen and Dr Dimitra Fimi, on Thursday 17th June at 5pm BST via Zoom webinar. Rob and Dimitra will interview Katherine about the book and all things Narnia, before giving attendees the opportunity to participate in a Q&A with Katherine.

Click here to book your free ticket via Eventbrite.

More information about the book here.

You can access Katherine Langrish’s website here.

To join the Centre’s mailing list to receive newsletters about our events, activities, and opportunities, please click here.

Mapping the Impossible: Journal for Fantasy Research

by Oliver Langmead

Mapping the Impossible is a brand new open-access student journal publishing peer-reviewed research into fantasy and the fantastic. The editorial board and reviewers are composed of current students and recent graduates from institutions across the world, and we are so pleased to be opening for submissions this month. If you’d like to get involved, we are currently looking for reviewers and we would love to hear from you.

We currently have two issues lined up. Our first issue, to be published in October 2021, will be a special issue for papers submitted from this year’s GIFCon. Our second issue, to be published in March 2022, will be a general issue. We operate with a rolling submissions window, and if you’re interested in submitting to us, we would love to see your paper no matter when it’s ready! Check out our submissions page for the details and guidelines.

Mapping the Impossible has been developed specifically with early-career research into fantasy and the fantastic in mind. We exclusively publish papers by current students and recent graduates, and we define “fantasy” very broadly. Our aim is to highlight the brilliant work being done by undergraduates, postgraduates and student researchers looking into fantasy, and give them a new avenue to publication.

We are affiliated with and supported by the University of Glasgow’s Centre for Fantasy and the Fantastic along with the annual fantasy research conference GIFCon, and are generously hosted by the University of Glasgow. It’s wonderful to be a part of such a vibrant community of fantasts, and we strongly encourage checking out the Centre, GIFCon, and the University of Glasgow’s Masters in Fantasy if the research we’re publishing inspires you.

On a personal note – putting together this journal, along with my colleagues Katarina O’Dette and Emma French, has been a real work of love, and we have a lot of people to thank for helping us get it off the ground. In the first instance, we have to highlight the wonderful work being done over at our sister publication, Press Start, who are publishing early career research in Game Studies and were the inspiration for Mapping the Impossible. The Press Start team have provided us with brilliant support in setting up, and without Matt Barr it’s likely we would have never got off the ground. Everyone at the Centre for Fantasy has been so enthusiastic and helpful, and their guidance has helped us work out the fine details of what you see today. And a special thanks must go to my brilliant sister, Lois Langmead, who was generous enough to donate some really wonderful illustrations to the site.

The Immanent Grove: Memorialising the achievements of the University of Glasgow’s Fantasy graduates

2020 was a year for reflection. In the course of her reflections, PhD student Lucy Holdsworth came up with the idea of memorialising the achievements of the University of Glasgow’s Fantasy graduates: students like herself who had taken the bold step of enrolling on the University’s MLitt in Fantasy, regardless of the puzzlement, amusement and even disapproval such a step might bring about. Since the foundation of the MLitt (formally the MLitt English Literature: Fantasy) in September 2015, many students from all over the world have joined the programme, united in their love of the mode or genre called Fantasy, a genre that permeates the creative arts in the twenty-first century but whose study is as yet in its infancy. Many of those students have gone on to work with Fantasy in other capacities, whether as PhD students, like Lucy, or as teachers, publishers, videogame professionals, novelists, entertainers and vocal advocates. Their passion is infectious, their imagination boundless, their thinking innovative and courageous. Their work and mutual support deserves some form of recognition.

How better to celebrate these graduates, Lucy thought, than with the gift of trees? Trees permeate Fantasy literature, from the walking trees and their tree-like shepherds, the Ents, in J.R.R. Tolkien’s The Lord of the Rings, to the trees that populate the slopes of Mervyn Peake’s Gormenghast Mountain; from the village trees of the Douen in Nalo Hopkinson’s Midnight Robber to the mysterious branch-like lettering that obsesses a young librarian in Patricia McKillip’s Alphabet of Thorn. Forests are everywhere in fairy tales, myths and chivalric romances, and have a tendency to fill our dreams. As Ursula K. Le Guin puts it, ‘We all have forests in our minds. Forests unexplored, unending. Each of us gets lost in the forest, every night, alone’. Fantasy pays tribute to these mental forests and explores their depths.

In the twenty-first century, forests also hold the key to the future. Without extensive reforestation it is hard to imagine a way to counter the destructive effects of human dominance of the planet. For all these reasons, Lucy found her thoughts turning to a project called Trees for Life, which aims to rewild the ancient Caledonian forest by planting saplings at remote sites in the Highlands of Scotland. Planting trees for the MLitt students seemed like the perfect way to salute their achievements and to celebrate the community they have formed. No one knows where each of the Trees for Life will be; we only know that each will make a small contribution to enriching a larger whole. In this way each tree is like a student of fantasy, each of whom makes a small but vital contribution to a new but rapidly expanding field of study with its roots in the past, just as the trees we plant in their honour have their roots in soil that has been enriched by ancient leaves and branches.

Lucy explained her thinking to her supervisor, Matt Sangster, one of the founding members of Glasgow’s recently-launched Centre for Fantasy and the Fantastic. Matt at once set about the process of putting her vision into practice, consulting fellow members of the Centre and obtaining funding from a generous donor to plant the first set of trees. This blog post marks the launch of Lucy’s memorial, and will be followed by an informal launch event on 24 February.

We have named our widely-scattered Grove the Immanent Grove after a wood on the Island of Roke in Ursula Le Guin’s classic fantasy series, the Books of Earthsea. Many people think that this wood ‘moves about in a mystifying manner’; but in this they are mistaken, Le Guin informs us, ‘for the Grove does not move. Its roots are the roots of being. It is all the rest that moves’. May our wood, planted in the name of our graduates who are moving on, help to move the world on, too, in a better direction.

Rob Maslen, Co-Director, Centre for Fantasy and the Fantastic, University of Glasgow

There is always smoke rising from Glasgow these days.

My walk to university had always been a pleasant one—under the shade of young trees by the canal, down past a dim and mysterious grove, and on towards the west end. I knew where to look for foxes and deer, made friends with the squirrels, and even tempted a bird or two to say hello.

Pleasant, that is, until the grove vanished, broken stumps torn up and turned over, all trace of the vibrant ecosystem scraped away to make room for construction.

Not long after, I moved, this time to a flat surrounded by trees almost as tall as my building—old, majestic, strong. They have been torn down too; a carpark covers their grave.

While I understood the reason—people need homes, people need schools, and they have to go somewhere—still it felt like a betrayal, and unbidden, the voice of Treebeard began to echo in my mind: ‘there are wastes of stump and bramble where once there were singing groves. I have been idle. I have let things slip. It must stop!’

I don’t have any power over Glasgow’s dwindling green spaces, but what I do have is an imagination and a community of people who, like me, were raised on stories of the beauty and magic of forests, and so the seed (sorry) of an idea began to grow.

Fantasy is often dismissed as mere escapism, but Le Guin reminds us that ‘escape is the direction of freedom’. Freedom from tyranny, freedom from oppression, freedom from our own abuse of power—once we have imagined a world in which we are free from these things, we begin to see a path towards it. Fantasy is the first step of all activism, and as such, it has an incredible power to change the world for the better. The Centre has used this power to imagine and create a world in which academia and environmentalism can go hand in hand, but it is my hope that the Immanent Grove will act as a catalyst for wider action in this vein. Tolkien said of escapism that, ‘if we value the freedom of mind and soul, if we’re partisans of liberty, then it’s our plain duty to escape, and take as many people with us as we can.’ I look forward to escaping into a better world with you all and creating a future we can be proud of.

Lucinda Holdsworth, PhD student, Centre for Fantasy and the Fantastic, University of Glasgow

Because we wouldn’t want to plant trees for our graduates without their permission, we’ve begun the Grove by inviting our most recent graduating cohort, the Owls, who finished their degrees amidst the complexities of lockdown and pandemic. Their names and their messages can now be seen on the website that logs the Grove’s progress. Their trees will be planted in the Highlands in the spring.

We’re keen to expand the Grove to include all our MLitt Fantasy graduates who’d like to be included: Canaries, Phoenixes, Ravens and Merlins. If you’re a member of one of these cohorts and would like a tree added to the Grove in your name, please fill out this form to let us know how you’d like to be named and whether you’d like to add a message.

Please return the completed form to the Fantasy Centre e-mail address (arts-fantasy@glasgow.ac.uk), using ‘Immanent Grove’ in the subject line.

Moving forward, we’ll also be planting trees for the current MLitt cohort (the Nightingales) and for those who’ve yet to join us. We also look forward to adding our PhD students to the Grove as they successfully defend their theses.

Matt Sangster, Senior Lecturer and Core Team Member, Centre for Fantasy and the Fantastic, University of Glasgow

Join us on the 24th of February for an evening of magic and nature to celebrate the brilliance of our students and the wonderful work done by Lucy Holdsworth and Matt Sangster, who made this project possible. Let’s talk about trees, fantasy, and the Glasgow Fantasy program.

Click here to get your ticket.

A celebration of collaborative fantasy storytelling: a report and reading list from the Centre’s Fantasy and D&D event

It was great to see so many people from all over the world join us for a talk and discussion on Fantasy and D&D, co-organized by our Centre and the Games and Gaming Lab. Our main speaker, John D. Rateliff, has very kindly offered us his talk for publication on our blog, which you can read here.

We are also delighted to share a report on our event by our Fantasy MLitt student Hannah Burton, accompanied by a list of titles mentioned in the event compiled by our PhD student Grace Worm.

A report from the Centre’s Fantasy and D&D event, by Hannah Burton

Like many of you, I have travelled to the lands of Middle-earth, Azeroth or the Forgotten Realms. These worlds have allowed us to escape, create agency within our own world, or in the case of Dungeons and Dragons, become a part of a world created by collaborative storytelling. In a time dominated by isolation and computer screens, Dungeons and Dragons, or D&D, has become a social outlet for many, lessening the feelings of separation and isolation with role-playing adventure parties. Sometimes you just need to escape reality, even for an hour, so you can live your dream of being a bard who makes beautiful music with a priceless lute.

During lockdown, the Centre for Fantasy and the Fantastic, co-presented with the Games and Gaming Labs, held the event “D&D and Fantasy Fiction: Giants in the Oerth” to discuss the literary inspirations and history behind D&D. Discussions began with Grace A.T. Worm, a 2nd-year PhD student, engaging the audience as the ‘Dungeon Master’ for the evening to discuss how D&D gave role-playing games their continued success in popular culture. D&D is unique in its ability to create diverse worlds that players can create through what Worm described as “collective storytelling.” This collaboration is key in navigating the game as it concerns both the absorption of D&D’s vast world-building while also creating a place for players to develop teamwork through adventuring parties. D&D’s popularity in the past decade has also been affected by Critical Role and The Adventure Zone through their visual storytelling. Worm utilised this interactive aspect of the game in her discussion, giving the audience a chance to create their own characters via simplified character sheets provided in her presentation. This small ‘one-shot’ gave the audience a glimpse into the experience of playing D&D, and how it can spark one’s imagination by simply picking a character.

After this, Tolkien scholar, John D. Rateliff, began his talk about the movement of fantasy fiction to D&D into game-inspired fiction. Rateliff contends that fantasy has always been a part of D&D as seen in the original Dungeon Master’s guide in 1979, as its core structure is heavily affected by the works of authors like J.R.R. Tolkien and Robert E. Howard. A memorable moment from Rateliff’s paper was his statement that D&D is heavily influenced by fantasy literature because of how permeable the borders are between the two. For Rateliff, it is these permeable borders that develop the imagination of world-building of future games and players. The last part of Rateliff’s paper leaves viewers with early images of a signpost that features Gygax’s world, Greyhawk, and Middle-earth on the same post, proving that Gygax himself created D&D with fantasy worlds like Tolkien’s in mind.

The session then moved into the Q&A, moderated by 1st year PhD student, Emma French. Topics began with Rateliff’s first involvement in D&D, to the role of violence as a driving force in D&D. As D&D was originally a war game, Rateliff notes that the game has slowly moved away from this mentality. The questions then moved onto a more heated topic in the recent months: the changing attitudes of race and diversity within D&D. This movement, according to Rateliff, will have a tremendous impact on the future of both D&D and Fantasy literature. Another notable question for Rateliff was why fantasy has been the dominant force in RPGs. For Rateliff, this has to do with fantasy being united under Tolkien as he was such a dominating force on 20th-century Fantasy: “Tolkien is such a big light in the room that it dims other lights.” This continued with other topics such as Dunsany’s influence on Fantasy, editorial work for RPG publications, and if fantasy functions differently in a game setting. The entire Q&A session with Rateliff was diverse and displayed the audience’s wide interests in learning more about the connection between Fantasy literature and D&D. 

Overall, this event provided solace and fellowship both on and off-screen. I want to end this post with a final quote from John. D. Rateliff as I feel it expresses the overall tone of the talk: “D&D starts local and small and then the world gets bigger each time you explore it.” The exploration of worlds should not only be read through characters like Bilbo Baggins and his adventure into Middle-earth, it should also be shared in games like D&D through storytelling, especially during a time that seems more detached than ever.

A list of authors, texts, game books, and games mentioned during the Fantasy and D&D event, compiled by Grace Worm

Authors:

  • Johannes Cabal
  • J.R.R. Tolkien
    • The History of the Hobbit, The Lord of the Rings
  • Lord Dunsany
    • The Book of Wonder, The Charwoman’s Shadow, Don Rodriguez: Chronicles of Shadow Valley, The Dreamer’s Tale, The King of Elfland’s Daughter, The Last Book of Wonder

Texts:

  • Bridge of Birds by Barry Hughart
  • Building Imaginary Worlds: The Theory and History of Subcreation by Mark Wolf
  • The CRPG Book: A Guide to Computer Role-Playing Games By Felipe Pepe
  • Dave Areneson’s True Genius by Robert J. Kuntz
  • “Demonizing the Enemy, Literally: Tolkien, Orcs, and the Sense of the World Wars” by Robert T. Tally, Jr.
  • The Elusive Shift by Jon Peterson
    • History of RPGs and their relationship to wargames
  • The Gentleman’s Bastard series by Scott Lynch
  • H.P. Lovecraft and the Cthulhu Mythos by Robert Price
  • Johannes Cabal the Necromancer by Jonathan L. Howard
  • The Kingkiller Chronicles by Patrick Rothfuss
  • Kings of the Wyld by Nicholas Eames
  • A Land Fit for Heroes series by Richard K. Morgan
  • Matthew Swift series by Kate Griffin (or Catherine Webb or Claire North)
  • Pendragon: Journal of an Adventure through Time and Space series by D.J. MacHale
  • The Rivers of London by Ben Aaronovitch
  • The Rook by Daniel O’Malley
  • Six of Crows by Leigh Bardugo
  • “Sturgeon’s Law” by James Gunn
  • The Water Dancer by Ta-Nehisi Coates
  • White Wolf Magazine
  • Wingfeather Saga by Andrew Peterson

Official DnD Wizards of the Coast Books:

Games:

  • Age of Heroes
  • Angband
  • Ars Magica
  • Call of Cthulhu 
  • Dragon Warriors
  • The Dungeons of Moria
  • FATE
  • Fiasco
  • Legend of the Five Rings
  • Mage: the Ascension
  • Magic the Gathering
  • Rolemaster
  • Shadow of the Demon Lord
  • Shadowrun
  • Vampire: the Masquerade

If you missed this event, our YouTube recording is available here: